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The management of moderate and severe HIV-associated psoriasis is challenging, although patients typically improve with highly active antiretroviral therapy

The management of moderate and severe HIV-associated psoriasis is challenging, although patients typically improve with highly active antiretroviral therapy 1

For moderate to severe disease, phototherapy and antiretrovirals are the recommended first-line therapeutic agents. Since the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART), infectious skin diseases are now outnumbered by inflammatory, autoimmune and malignant skin conditions. Although photosensitivity can be due to HIV infection itself, using HAART can further increase its prevalence. Psoriasis typically improves with HAART,32 but in HIV patients whose psoriasis remains moderate or severe, therapy can be challenging. The rationale for using highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) for HIV is not to cure the patient, but rather to reduce the incidence of AIDS defining illnesses and their associated morbidity and mortality. 18 ImportantlyNotably, psoriasis in HIV+ patients often follows an explosive course: preexisting psoriasis can flare with new HIV infection or clinical progression to AIDS, and abrupt onset of severe psoriasis often occurs with HIV-associated immune dysfunction, requiring emergent intervention. Treatment of EF is challenging, and no consensus exists on the optimal treatment for this condition. Although cutaneous TB is rare, it appears to be more common in patients co-infected with HIV and therefore deserves special mention.

The management of moderate and severe HIV-associated psoriasis is challenging, although patients typically improve with highly active antiretroviral therapy 223,25 Topical preparations are recommended as first-line therapy for mild to moderate HIV-associated psoriasis, according to the NPF, and ultraviolet therapy and antiretrovirals are second-line options.23 In cases of moderate to severe HIV-associated psoriasis, the second-line recommendation is oral retinoids, according to the NPF. However, some patients with HIV-associated arthritis have been reported to have a disease course of more than 6 weeks with joint destruction. The clinical, diagnostic, and radiographic features of HIV-associated spondyloarthritis are indistinguishable from those of the conventional HLA-B27-related disease, although HIV-positive patients have a higher overall frequency of uveitis, keratoderma, and onycholysis, and often a worse outcome, than HIV-negative patients. Immune-restoration syndrome related to highly active antiretroviral therapy. Low-to-moderate doses of corticosteroids are an effective treatment for both the glandular swelling and sicca symptoms, although this effect is transient. Despite the combined antiretroviral therapy has improved the length and quality of life of HIV infected patients, the survival of these patients is always decreased compared with the general population. The same factors may also contribute to complicate the clinical management of these patients. The cardiovascular disease: a challenge for the cure of HIV patients.

Erythroderma may be seen with both severe eczema and seborrheic dermatitis. Infliximab was successfully used in the treatment of HIV-associated Reiter syndrome,2 HIV-associated psoriasis and psoriasis arthritis,3 and HIV-associated Crohn disease. He had never required treatment with highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART). This blockade is a highly effective therapy for multiple sclerosis, with placebo controlled studies demonstrating up to a 68 reduction in clinical relapse rates, 42 reduced risk of sustained progressive disability, 92 fewer gadolinium enhancing lesions, and an 83 decrease in the accumulation of new or enlarging T2 hyperintense white matter lesions 3 5. While these patients were being treated for psoriasis, not MS, DMF is also used in the treatment of MS, necessitating vigilant monitoring for PML in this patient group as well. The incidence of contrast enhancement at initial diagnostic imaging in natalizumab associated PML is higher than that in HIV populations, with up to 43 of natalizumab symptomatic PML cases reporting contrast enhancement at diagnosis 21, compared with 15 in HIV populations 25.

Dermatologic Management Of Patients With Part 1: Cutaneous Manifestations And Complications

The management of moderate and severe HIV-associated psoriasis is challenging, although patients typically improve with highly active antiretroviral therapy 3The situation improved drastically after the introduction of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in around 1996 and by measurement of HIV viral load, and discovery of the causative virus?human herpesvirus 8. However, in HIV-infected patients, the presence of KS is associated with a five-time higher mortality compared to those without KS. The World Health Organization (WHO) published a guideline on the treatment of skin and oral HIV-associated conditions in children and adults. It has been shown that psoriasis increased the risk of chronic renal impairment and moderate to severe psoriasis was associated with chronic renal disease independent of traditional risk factors. There has been a significant and dramatic change in the management of HIV infection since the introduction of potent antiretroviral therapy in 1996. There has also been a significant decrease in morbidity and mortality among persons living with HIV infection resulting from improved access to care, prophylaxis against opportunistic infections, and antiretroviral therapy. There are increasing reports of complications associated with antiretroviral therapy that may require additional and more frequenting monitoring. Usually, HIV-infected infants have normal physical examinations, although a number of perinatal conditions are comorbid problems because of other maternal risk factors.

Hong Kong Journal Of Dermatology & Venereology