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Scalp involvement in psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis may resemble scalp DM

Scalp involvement in psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis may resemble scalp DM 1

Dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM) are idiopathic inflammatory myopathies, characterized by the shared features of proximal skeletal muscle weakness and evidence of muscle inflammation. Scalp involvement in psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis may resemble scalp DM. Lesions may be papules, vesicles, pustules, and nodules. Young children, the elderly and immunocompromised may also have palm and sole involvement, as well as lesions on the face, neck, ear and scalp. Crusted scabies is a hyperkeratotic skin disease resembling psoriasis. Apply treatment to the whole body, including the scalp, neck, face, and ears, and especially between the fingers and toes and under the nails. DM sine myositis, also known as ADM, is diagnosed in patients with typical cutaneous disease in whom no evidence of muscle weakness exists and in whom serum muscle enzyme levels are repeatedly in the reference range. These patients have muscle involvement, but their condition may still be classified as ADM. Patients may also complain of a scaly scalp or diffuse hair loss. Clinical distinction from seborrheic dermatitis or psoriasis is occasionally difficult.

Scalp involvement in psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis may resemble scalp DM 2It is most commonly associated with seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis but appears often without any noticeable skin lesion or obvious diagnosis. Other non neuronal unique properties of scalp that may play role in scalp itch. Although the lesion resembles tinea corporis, the presence of similar lesions on the extensor surfaces of the knee and a positive family history confirmed the diagnosis of psoriasis. Although the lesion resembles tinea corporis, the presence of similar lesions on the extensor surfaces of the knee and a positive family history confirmed the diagnosis of psoriasis. Tinea scalp infection also may result in a cell-mediated immune response termed a kerion, which is a boggy, sterile, inflammatory scalp mass. It may be difficult to distinguish psoriasis from seborrheic dermatitis.

Patients may also report a scaly scalp or diffuse hair loss. Muscle involvement manifests as proximal muscle weakness. These lesions may resemble lesions of lupus erythematosus (LE), psoriasis, or lichen planus (LP). Clinical distinction from seborrheic dermatitis or psoriasis is occasionally difficult. This involvement may lead on to erythroderma. Sometimes, scabies can be localized to the scalp, penis, face, finger and soles. Although the classic, hyperkeratotic, nonpruritic lesions are most common, reported cases have ranged in spectrum from crusting with pruritus to a pruritic, papular dermatitis to those resembling Darier’s disease or psoriasis. Schlesinger I, Oelrich DM, Tyring SK. Palmoplantar psoriasis resembles pustular psoriasis and is associated with yellowbrown sterile pustules on the palms and soles. Scalp psoriasis is characterized by plaques on the scalp and along the hair margin, the plaques becoming thicker and crusted as the disease develops. 7 While the scalp is the major area involved, in some cases the lesions may extend to the forehead, neck, ear, and retroauricular areas. Seborrheic psoriasis is a condition whereby seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis co-exist.

The Itchy Scalp

Scalp involvement in psoriasis or seborrheic dermatitis may resemble scalp DM 3(ii) Keratino-cytes from both involved and uninvolved psoriatic skin are 100 times less sensitive to growth inhibition by 1,25-dihydroxyvita-min D3 than normal keratinocytes (39). Psoriatic skin, therefore, appears to be sensitized toward disease which may be triggered by exogenous (environmental) or endogenous factors (e. The immune system has been strongly implicated in the pathogenesis of psoriasis since it resembles a T cell-mediated autoimmune disease (reviewed in refs 52 54). These include psoriatic arthritis, sebopsoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, eczema and a variety of other dermatoses. Scarring alopecia, a common consequence of scalp involvement, should be distinguished by the astute clinician from the increased incidence of alopecia areata in the setting of DLE. Topical steroids and/or oral antihistamines Many lesions can resemble lichen sclerosis et atrophicus (LS&A), and some authors believe that the lesions of so-called superficial morphea and LS&A lie along a spectrum.

Dermatomyositis (dm)