Skip to content

Psoriasis shares some similarities with seborrheic dermatitis, including a genetic predisposition

Psoriasis shares some similarities with seborrheic dermatitis, including a genetic predisposition 1

Although its pathogenesis is not completely understood, some postulate that the condition results from colonization of the skin of affected individuals with species of the genus Malassezia (formerly, Pityrosporum). A variety of treatment modalities are available, including eradication of the fungus, reducing or treating the inflammatory process, and decreasing sebum production. A number of conditions may be confused with seborrheic dermatitis, such as psoriasis, atopic and contact dermatitis, and erythrasma. No genetic predisposition has been identified with seborrheic dermatitis. Pain and pruritus do share some neurophysiologic pathways. Other itch-producing chemicals include opiates, papain, and members of the chemical group called kinins. TThe apparent similarities between pruritus and pain have led a number of investigators to look for specific pruritus nerve fibres in the skin that may parallel specific pain pathways. In patients with a genetic predisposition to psoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis is believed to trigger psoriasis or evolve into psoriasis. Psoriasis shampoo on the scalp is generally the best for other locations of the body.

Psoriasis shares some similarities with seborrheic dermatitis, including a genetic predisposition 2Diseases and disorders of the scalp can cause scalp conditions that include excessive oiliness, excessive flaking, inflammation, patchy scabbing and intense pruritus (itchiness). It shares some features with psoriasis (see Psoriasis of the Scalp), and some investigators have proposed that seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis may have some genetic predispositions in common. It shares some features with psoriasis (see Psoriasis of the Scalp), and some investigators have proposed that seborrheic dermatitis and psoriasis may have some genetic predispositions in common. Although the skin disease psoriasis was first recognized as a distinct disease as early as 1808 (1), its pathogenic mechanisms have eluded investigators for decades. Activity of this suppressor would be affected by certain HLA antigens and its gene would be highly mutable to explain the high incidence of sporadic cases. The streptococcal M protein also shares structural and immunological similarities with myosin (82), tropomyosin (83) and vimentin (84), and streptococcal lipoteichoic acids can bind laminin, a component of the basement membrane (85). These include psoriatic arthritis, sebopsoriasis, seborrheic dermatitis, eczema and a variety of other dermatoses. Seborrheic dermatitis is a chronic inflammatory disorder affecting areas of the head and trunk where sebaceous glands are most prominent. Lipophilic yeasts of the Malassezia genus, as well as genetic, environmental and general health factors, contribute to this disorder. Treatment options include application of selenium sulfide, pyrithione zinc or ketoconazole-containing shampoos, topical ketoconazole cream or terbinafine solution, topical sodium sulfacetamide and topical corticosteroids. Why some persons develop seborrheic dermatitis and others do not is unclear.

Psoriasis is a long-lasting autoimmune disease characterized by patches of abnormal skin. Psoriasis is generally thought to be a genetic disease which is triggered by environmental factors. Additional types of psoriasis affecting the skin include inverse psoriasis, guttate psoriasis, oral psoriasis, and seborrheic-like psoriasis. Seborrheic-like psoriasis is a common form of psoriasis with clinical aspects of psoriasis and seborrheic dermatitis, and may be difficult to distinguish from the latter. While they share some similarities, lice and dandruff are two different conditions that require different treatments. Dandruff, also called seborrheic dermatitis, is the flaking of your scalp skin. Buildup of shampoo on the scalp, excessively dry or oily skin, and autoimmune conditions like psoriasis are common causes of dandruff. Dandruff can be tough to prevent if you’re genetically predisposed to the condition. There is some truth in the belief that the skin mirrors a person’s internal health. The hereditary diseases psoriasis and atopic eczema are examples of skin disorders in which sunlight (as an extrinsic factor) or stress (as an intrinsic factor) activate the condition. Dermatitis is classified into several different types, including contact dermatitis, atopic dermatitis, and seborrheic dermatitis. Genetic predisposition undoubtedly plays a part, however, which explains why some workers, but not others, suffer from occupational dermatitis, despite equal exposure.

Hair Foundation Article

Because these scalp conditions share similar clinical manifestations of scaling, inflammation, hair loss, and pruritus, differential diagnosis is critically important. Seborrheic dermatitis and dandruff are now known to be two ends of a single disease spectrum caused by Malassezia species ( Gemmer et al, 2002;Erchiga and Florencio, 2002). There is a genetic predisposition to psoriasis and family history is therefore important. Eczema-Psoriasis-DermatitsPsoriasis Care. Seborrheic dermatitis is usually seen in areas of the skin that are rich in sebaceous glands and sebum. These would include the scalp, face, eyebrows, beard, nose, ears, neck, chest, navel, armpits, and groin area. genetic predisposition. In some cases, the prolonged use of topical steroids can also lead to a rebound effect. Ask or Just Share! There are some individuals who have a genetic predisposition towards this disease. Psoriasis typically appears on the elbows and knees; however, it can occur anywhere on the skin. Sometimes, scalp psoriasis can be confused with seborrheic dermatitis of the scalp due to the similarities like itching and excessive scaling. The doctor will look for the characteristic scaling plaques on the areas of the body which is typical in distribution of psoriasis. Oral medications include methotrexate, cyclosporine, acitretin etc.

Psoriasis