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Photosensitive Psoriasis and Plaque Psoriasis

Photosensitive Psoriasis and Plaque Psoriasis 1

Plaque psoriasis is the most common presentation of psoriasis. Photosensitive psoriasis: psoriasis worst in the sun-exposed areas of the face, neck, hands and forearms Most patients with psoriasis find ultraviolet light very helpful for their psoriasis. Photosensitive Psoriasis and Plaque Psoriasis. Psoriasis, which is worst in the sun-exposed areas of the face, neck, hands and forearms, is referred to as Photosensitive psoriasis, a type of Plaque Psoriasis. Some people have photosensitive psoriasis, a form that flares up when summer sunlight hits it. Mild sunburn can make existing psoriasis plaques more uncomfortable and cause new patches to form.

Photosensitive Psoriasis and Plaque Psoriasis 2However, some people have photosensitive psoriasis, which actually improves in winter and worsens in summer when skin is exposed to sunlight. The infections may also worsen ordinary plaque psoriasis. So I am 16, male and have plaque psoriasis on my scalp, finger nails, genitals, butt crack, and a small spot right by my anus. I didn’t know what.

A subset of patients with chronic plaque psoriasis exhibits severely photosensitive psoriasis (PP) with a pronounced seasonal pattern, but the pathomechanism is not understood. The association of CAD with photosensitive psoriasis is very rare. The technical or scientific name for plaque psoriasis is psoriasis vulgaris (vulgaris means ‘common’). Photosensitive psoriasis: Psoriasis worst in the sun-exposed areas of the face, neck, hands and forearms.

Psoriasis

Guttate psoriasis is a distinctive acute skin eruption characterised by small drop-like, salmon-pink papules which usually have a fine scale. PUVA side-effects – eg, nausea and vomiting, photosensitivity. In some people with psoriasis such injury can start a new plaque of psoriasis at the site of the injury. Photosensitivity is an abnormally high sensitivity to sunlight which can be caused by some medications. Skin biopsy sections of sunexposed psoriatic plaques and of non-sun-exposed, uninvolved skin (which were stained with fluorescein-tagged anti-IgG, anti-IgM, anti-IgA, and anti-C3) showed granular deposits of IgM and C3 at the dermal-epidermal junction in the sun-exposed plaques, and IgM alone in a granular pattern at the dermal-epidermal junction in uninvolved skin.

Severely Photosensitive Psoriasis: A Phenotypically Defined Patient Subset