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Assessment of psoriasis severity requires both physical scoring (PASI) and consideration of quality of life measures (DLQI)

Assessment of psoriasis severity requires both physical scoring (PASI) and consideration of quality of life measures (DLQI) 1

Assessment of psoriasis severity requires both physical scoring (PASI) and consideration of quality of life measures (DLQI). Identification of treatment goals will guide clinicians in treatment decision-making, enhance the availability and appropriate use of therapies and increase patient satisfaction with their care. In clinical trials, more objective, validated instruments are required. Quality of life measures are helpful for demonstrating that changes in the severity of the skin lesions correspond to improvement in patients’ lives. This system shows a good correlation with both physician global assessment and PASI scores and provides better intrarater and interrater reliability than PASI. Psoriasis can be both emotionally and physically debilitating and impact on quality of life significantly. Objective assessment of the body surface area (BSA) involvement, disease location, thickness and symptoms, presence or absence of psoriatic arthritis, and any associated comorbidities.

The panel agreed by consensus on recommended psoriasis treatment goals in the Australian environment 2Patients with a diagnosis of moderate to severe plaque psoriasis and an affected BSA of 5 for at least 1 year were eligible for the study. Validity of the PRO measures was assessed in several ways. The assessment of disease activity in PsA should therefore evaluate each of these clinical domains carefully. An accurate measurement of disease activity is essential to guide the medical therapy and monitor the treatment response. It appeared that none of the severity scores used for psoriasis met all of the validation criteria required for an ideal score. The correlation with quality of life measures is poor 16. Change scores were reported where available for continuous outcomes in preference to final values. If a person of any age with psoriasis requiring topical therapy has a physical disability, or cognitive or visual impairment offer advice and practical support that take into account the person’s individual needs.

The impact of psoriasis on patients’ quality of life may be quite destructive, and measures of disease status alone seem to have questionable validity in describing the true burden of illness. The mean PASI score was 8.6 and the mean age at onset was 33.6 years. Severity of psoriasis was associated with a marked impact on quality of life. Those enrolled were also required to have started treatment with systemic drugs, phototherapy, and/or topical treatment between 2004 and 2006.

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